Michael Kluckner hits nostalgia nerve at Marpole Historical Society

Artist and author Michael Kluckner explains the architectural changes in old and new Vancouver in a presentation for the Marpole Historical Society on March 9, 2013.

Artist and author Michael Kluckner explains the architectural changes in old and new Vancouver in a presentation for the Marpole Historical Society on March 9, 2013.

A plethora of collective “ahs” filled St. Augustine’s Parish Hall last Saturday, when Michael Kluckner, an expert on Vancouver history, showed slides of the former White Spot on Granville and 67th Ave.

Most of the nearly 100 seniors who attended Kluckner’s presentation about old and new South Vancouver, spent a big chunk of their spare time and money at one of the city’s top social centres of the era. Continue reading

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Marpole Historical Society presents Michael Kluckner’s view on Vancouver’s vanishing history

Whenever Michael Kluckner reads “opportunities for builders” on real estate listings, he knows it’s time to pack his watercolour set and document another Vancouver house that is about to vanish.

Rezoning is big business in Vancouver in and March, the city is particularly abuzz with information sessions and public hearings about architectural changes such as high rises, laneway houses and townhouse complexes.

Vancouver's first children's hospital, built 1921, at Hudson Str. and 67th Ave. in Marpole. Painted in 1989 by Michael Kluckner for the book Vanishing Vancouver

Vancouver’s first children’s hospital, built 1921, at Hudson Str. and 67th Ave. in Marpole. Painted in 1989 by Michael Kluckner for the book Vanishing Vancouver

“Laneway housing isn’t a bad idea, but you cannot call it affordable,” said author and artist Michael Kluckner, who wrote several books about Vancouver’s vanishing architecture, and the lifestyle that came with it. Continue reading